Project chartering is a summary /record of all the key factors for a successful project, brief enough that it can be displayed in a flipchart-sized sheet of paper. It should include the most important objectives, create boundaries and reciprocal agreements between the projects’ implementation team and external stakeholders

The Agile community has developed and appropriated a great number of useful “capture project information” techniques. We can take the “rich picture” approach of soft systems as an example, as well as the “context diagram” from a structured analysis; or Lean manufacturing’s A3.

 

when using the project charter technique you should definitely avoid at any cost is using any kind of  “document template” to create a project charter, since the activity is more valuable than the delivery in the exercise.
Avoid creating long burdensome documents that will more likely never get looked twice, try to focus on the context-specific information that will guide the team toward good decisions, and remember a project charter should be no longer than a single sheet of paper.

You can tell a project is not going well by the discrepancy in the answers of different members of a team to questions involving the project’s direction, such as “what is the main goal of this project?”, that said is important to note that the outcome of the project is intrinsically aligned with the effort within the team, it can only work if all members of the team agree with this direction.